2.5 billion. That’s approximately the number of times the human heart beats in 70 years. And sometimes during the course of its unrelenting contractions and relaxations, the heart muscle can no longer bear the strain.

If heart muscle cells—cardiomyocytes—could be repaired by cells taken from one’s own body, the patient’s recovery improves. But manufacturing heart cells requires an exacting process tailored specifically to an individual.

Laid out in a new article published today in Advanced Functional Materials, a team of researchers at Michigan Technological University in collaboration with Harvard Medical School, shows how cardiomyocytes grown in a heart-like environment mature more quickly, have improved functionality and are less likely to be rejected by patients’ bodies. Read the entire story on Michigan Tech’s news website.

Contact: Parisa Pour Shahid Saeed Abadi, pabadi@mtu.edu

 


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