If you receive Social Security benefits, you may have to pay federal income tax on part of your benefits. These IRS tips will help you determine whether or not you need to pay taxes on your benefits. They also explain the best way to file your tax return.

  • Form SSA-1099. If you received Social Security in 2014, you should receive a Form SSA-1099, Social Security Benefit Statement, showing the amount of your benefits.
  • Only Social Security.  If Social Security was your only income in 2014, your benefits may not be taxable. You also may not need to file a federal income tax return. If you get income from other sources you may have to pay taxes on some of your benefits.
  • Free File.  Use IRS Free File to prepare and e-file your tax return for free. If you earned $60,000 or less, you can use brand-name software. The software does the math for you and helps avoid mistakes. If you made more than $60,000, you can use Free File Fillable Forms. This option uses electronic versions of IRS paper forms. It is best for people who are used to doing their own taxes. Free File is available only on IRS.gov/freefile.
  • Interactive Tax Assistant.  The IRS has a helpful tool that you can use to see if any of your benefits are taxable. Visit IRS.gov and use the Interactive Tax Assistant.
  • Tax Formula. Here’s a quick way to find out if you must pay taxes on your Social Security benefits: Add one-half of your Social Security to all your other income, including tax-exempt interest. Then compare the total to the base amount for your filing status. If your total is more than the base amount, some of your benefits may be taxable.
  • Base Amounts.  The three base amounts are:
    • $25,000 – if you are single, head of household, qualifying widow or widower with a dependent child or married filing separately and lived apart from your spouse for all of 2014
    • $32,000 – if you are married filing jointly
    • $0 – if you are married filing separately and lived with your spouse at any time during the year

 

Still Time to Make Your IRA Contribution for the 2014 Tax Year

Did you contribute to an Individual Retirement Arrangement last year? Are you thinking about contributing to your IRA now?

  • Age rules.  You must be under age 70½ at the end of the tax year in order to contribute to a traditional IRA. There is no age limit to contribute to a Roth IRA.
  • Compensation rules. You must have taxable compensation to contribute to an IRA. This includes income from wages and salaries and net self-employment income. It also includes tips, commissions, bonuses and alimony. If you are married and file a joint tax return, only one spouse needs to have compensation in most cases.
  • When to contribute. You can contribute to an IRA at any time during the year. To count for 2014, you must contribute by the due date of your tax return. This does not include extensions. That means most people must contribute by April 15, 2015. If you contribute between Jan. 1 and April 15, make sure your plan sponsor applies it to the year you choose (2014 or 2015).
  • Contribution limits.  In general, the most you can contribute to your IRA for 2014 is the smaller of either your taxable compensation for the year or $5,500. If you were age 50 or older at the end of 2014, the maximum you can contribute increases to $6,500. If you contribute more than these limits, an additional tax will apply. The added tax is 6 percent of the excess amount that you contributed.
  • Taxability rules.  You normally won’t pay income tax on funds in your traditional IRA until you start taking distributions from it. Qualified distributions from a Roth IRA are tax-free.
  • Deductibility rules.  You may be able to deduct some or all of your contributions to your traditional IRA. Use the worksheets in the Form 1040A or Form 1040 instructions to figure the amount that you can deduct. You may claim the deduction on either form. You may not deduct contributions to a Roth IRA.
  • Saver’s Credit.  If you contribute to an IRA you may also qualify for the Saver’s Credit. The credit can reduce your taxes up to $2,000 if you file a joint return. Use Form 8880, Credit for Qualified Retirement Savings Contributions, to claim the credit. You can file Form 1040A or 1040 to claim the Saver’s Credit.

Key Points to Know about Early Retirement Distributions

Some people take an early withdrawal from their IRA or retirement plan. Doing so in many cases triggers an added tax on top of the income tax you may have to pay.

  1. Early Withdrawals.  An early withdrawal normally means taking the money out of your retirement plan before you reach age 59½.
  2. Additional Tax.  If you took an early withdrawal from a plan last year, you must report it to the IRS. You may have to pay income tax on the amount you took out. If it was an early withdrawal, you may have to pay an added 10 percent tax.
  3. Nontaxable Withdrawals.  The added 10 percent tax does not apply to nontaxable withdrawals. They include withdrawals of your cost to participate in the plan. Your cost includes contributions that you paid tax on before you put them into the plan.

    A rollover is a type of nontaxable withdrawal. A rollover occurs when you take cash or other assets from one plan and contribute the amount to another plan. You normally have 60 days to complete a rollover to make it tax-free.

  4. Check Exceptions. There are many exceptions to the additional 10 percent tax. Some of the rules for retirement plans are different from the rules for IRAs. See IRS.gov for details about these rules.
  5. File Form 5329.  If you made an early withdrawal last year, you may need to file a form with your federal tax return. See Form 5329, Additional Taxes on Qualified Plans (Including IRAs) and Other Tax-Favored Accounts, for details.
  6. Use IRS e-file. Early withdrawal rules can be complex. IRS e-file is easiest and most accurate way to file your tax return. The tax software that you use to e-file will pick the right tax forms, do the math and help you get the tax benefits you’re due. Don’t forget that with IRS Free File, you can e-file for free. Free File is only available through the IRS website at gov/freefile.

Save on Your Taxes and for Retirement with the Saver’s Credit

If you contribute to a retirement plan, like a 401(k) or an IRA, you may be able to claim the Saver’s Credit. This credit can help you save for retirement and reduce the tax you owe:

  • Formal Name.  The formal name of the Saver’s Credit is the Retirement Savings Contribution Credit. The Saver’s Credit is in addition to other tax savings you get if you set aside money for retirement. For example, you may be able to deduct your contributions to a traditional IRA.
  • Maximum Credit.  The Saver’s Credit is worth up to $2,000 if you are married and file a joint return. The credit is worth up to $1,000 if you are single. The credit you receive is often much less than the maximum. This is due in part because of the deductions and other credits you may claim.
  • Income Limits. You may be able to claim the credit depending on your filing status and the amount of your yearly income. You may be eligible for the credit on your 2014 tax return if you are:
    • Married filing jointly with income up to $60,000
    • Head of household with income up to $45,000
    • Married filing separately or a single taxpayer with income up to $30,000
  • Other Rules. Other rules that apply to the credit include:
    • You must be at least 18 years of age.
    • You can’t have been a full-time student in 2014.
    • No other person can claim you as a dependent on their tax return.
  • Contribution Date.  You must have contributed to a 401(k) plan or similar workplace plan by the end of the year to claim this credit. However, you can contribute to an IRA by the due date of your tax return and still have it count for 2014. The due date for most people is April 15, 2015.
  • Form 8880.  File Form 8880, Credit for Qualified Retirement Savings Contributions, to claim the credit.
  • Free File.  If you can claim the credit, you can prepare and e-file your tax return for free using IRS Free File. The tax software will do the hard work for you. It will do the math and complete the right forms. Free File is available only through the IRS.gov website.

 

Seven Tips to Help You Determine if Your Gift is Taxable
If you gave money or property to someone as a gift, you may wonder about the federal gift tax. Many gifts are not subject to the gift tax. Here are seven tax tips about gifts and the gift tax.

  1. Nontaxable Gifts.  The general rule is that any gift is a taxable gift. However, there are exceptions to this rule. The following are not taxable gifts:
    • Gifts that do not exceed the annual exclusion for the calendar year,
    • Tuition or medical expenses you paid directly to a medical or educational institution for someone,
    • Gifts to your spouse (for federal tax purposes, the term “spouse” includes individuals of the same sex who are lawfully married),
    • Gifts to a political organization for its use, and
    • Gifts to charities.

 

  1. Annual Exclusion.  Most gifts are not subject to the gift tax. For example, there is usually no tax if you make a gift to your spouse or to a charity. If you give a gift to someone else, the gift tax usually does not apply until the value of the gift exceeds the annual exclusion for the year. For 2014 and 2015, the annual exclusion is $14,000.
  2. No Tax on Recipient.  Generally, the person who receives your gift will not have to pay a federal gift tax. That person also does not pay income tax on the value of the gift received.
  3. Gifts Not Deductible. Making a gift does not ordinarily affect your federal income tax. You cannot deduct the value of gifts you make (other than deductible charitable contributions).
  4. Forgiven and Certain Loans. The gift tax may also apply when you forgive a debt or make a loan that is interest-free or below the market interest rate.
  5. Gift-Splitting.  You and your spouse can give a gift up to $28,000 to a third party without making it a taxable gift. You can consider that one-half of the gift be given by you and one-half by your spouse.
  6. Filing Requirement. You must file Form 709, United States Gift (and Generation-Skipping Transfer) Tax Return, if any of the following apply:
    • You gave gifts to at least one person (other than your spouse) that amount to more  than the annual exclusion for the year.
    • You and your spouse are splitting a gift. This is true even if half of the split gift is less than the annual exclusion.
    • You gave someone (other than your spouse) a gift of a future interest that they can’t actually possess, enjoy, or from which they’ll receive income later.
    • You gave your spouse an interest in property that will terminate due to a future event.

For more information, see Publication 559, Survivors, Executors, and Administrators. You can view, download and print tax products on IRS.gov/forms anytime.

If you found this Tax Tip helpful, please share it through your social media platforms. A great way to get tax information is to use IRS Social Media. You can also subscribe to IRS Tax Tips or any of our e-news subscriptions.

 

Tax Guide for Seniors

Publication 554 (2014)

 

http://www.irs.gov/publications/p554/index.html


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